How much can you save with low-flow showerheads?

  • Save water, save dollars! And energy! 
  • Showers and baths are the third largest water use in a home.

What is the marginal cost of 1,000 gallons of service for a typical residential customer?

  • Block 2 water rate (3,000 to 5,000 gallons/mo.):$6.39 per 1,000 gallons
  • Sewer rate:                                                         $6.48 per 1,000 gallons*

                   *Up to 15,000 gallons/month for an individually-metered residence

  • Total:                                                                 $12.87 per 1,000 gallons (1.29 cents per gallon)

OWASA’s increasing block water conservation rates for individually-metered residences:

Block 1: 1,000 – 2,000 gal./mo.             $2.63 per 1,000 gallons

Block 2: 3,000 – 5,000 gal./mo.              6.39 per 1,000 gallons

Block 3: 6,000 – 10,000 gal./mo.           7.83 per 1,000 gallons

Block 4: 11,000 – 15,000 gal./mo.          10.94 per 1,000 gallons

Block 5: 16,000 or more gal./mo.            19.79 per 1,000 gallons

Showerhead water use by age of the showerhead

before 1980:           5 gallons per minute (gpm)

1980-94:                3 to 5 gpm

1994 standard:        2.5 gpm

Available now:         1.75 and 1.5 gpm

Old showerheads: Water use over a full year by a family of four if showerheads use 3 gpm: 21,024 gallons; water/sewer cost: $270

Low flow showerheads: Annual water use, family of 4 if 1.5 gpm water flow rate: 10,512 gallons; water/sewer cost: $135 (rounded)

Annual savings if showerheads use 1.5 gallons/minute flow vs. 3 gpm

family of 4: water savings: 50% or 10,512 gallons/yr.; water/sewer costs: save $135

family of 3: water savings:              7,884 gallons/yr.;  water/sewer costs: save  $101

family of 2: water savings:              5,256 gallons/yr.;  water/sewer costs: save    $67

For information on how to install a new showerhead, please click here.

Why is conservation important?

Water is essential to our quality of life:

  • public health and sanitation,
  • fire protection/public safety,
  • environmental protection,
  • business operation/employment , and
  • community services (both public and non-profit)

Drinking water and wastewater are pumped. Most of the energy for pumping comes from fossil fuels, which produce greenhouse gases. Conservation therefore reduces greenhouse gas emissions from generating electricity for use in our pumps.

Conservation reduces the need for multi-million dollar expansion of our water system capacities.

Water conservation: an investment in our community’s future.